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on december 18, 2008 with outgoing president george w. bush. listen to what he said, also his body language. [video clip] >> you said, i am optimistic that we can change the tone in washington. >> that was a hopeful person saying that. >> are you less hopeful? >> we work together, there were some bipartisan accomplishments but the rhetoric got very tough. some people here in this town use the politics of personal destruction to advance their agenda. i do not want to sound self- serving, but i have not. i do not think a president should. i was hoping for better tone, and it did not happen. host: as you reflect on george w. bush at the end of his two terms. guest: president obama has said things better very similar. it is not just about washington. washington is a reflection of a broader culture. we live in a polarized culture. we live in a culture that celebrates -- notoriety is the quickest ticket to 15 minutes in the 24 hour news cycle. the other enormous difference that contributes to this -- i do not know how you reverse it. 50 years ago, you had two political parties that were both appe
-- [inaudible] [laughter] we both use a little german. when george w. bush appointed an old family retainer i did a poem that rhymed with -- [inaudible] [laughter] and we both write about animals sometimes. he famously wrote a lot of things about cats. my daughter said once at the dinner table when somebody brought up cats, daddy hates cats. and i said daddy does not hate cat. that would be prejudiced, and you girls have been brought up to not have prejudice daddy has never met a cat he likes. [laughter] and i've written about corp. kor g.i.s. i wrote in a column once that corp. the dogs look like a breed of dogs that look like they have been assembled from oh parts of dogs. not the part that the breeds were sorry about giving up. [laughter] i'll admit there's never been a broadway show called cor g.i. i'm a second generation poet. my father was a grocer for most of his working life, but he had a restaurant for a few years, and he took advantage of that to write a menu at lunch every day. mostly about pie. not pi pie. pie. i had a lot of trouble with pi when i was in high school. math was my
$500 bonus cash. ♪ >>> graph time. during the george w. bush administration, government spending went up a lot. this is government expenditures per capita, per american person. it combines federal, and state and local governments, right? as you can see, it start there's when george w. bush took office in 2001, and it wasn't like there was just some individual spike in spending that happened right after 9/11. it was a steady, huge increase over time. so per capita government spending was roughly 12 grand per person when w. came into office. when he left office, it wasn't 12 grand anymore, it was 16 grand in government spending for every man, woman and child in the country. that is a big, steep increase. for comparison sake, if you look at bill clinton, who was in office for the same amount of time, bill clinton also saw a spending rise, but compared to dubbia, he kept spending under control. it really takes off, as you can see, when it goes to bush. since president obama has been in office, he has been better than both of them. he hasn't just held the reins, like clinton did, he has tu
president, and george w. bush was a guy who thought deeply about imuation reform, poverty and trying to craft a middle class agenda for the gop. george w. bush is a figure that many republicans have been running away from. so tell me, do you think republicans were too quick to abandon george w. bush? >> i'm sorry, what? i was tweeting. i'm sorry. [laughter] um, well, yes and no. i think, obviously, politically republicans distanced themselves from george w. bush because it was politic thing to do. numbers don't lie. he became very unpopular. parties tend not to embrace figures and politicians who become unpopular. my view is that a lot of the distress over bush's domestic agenda from which republicans fled beginning really in 2005 had, it was a, it was an ancillary result of the failure to secure victory in iraq early and to have a favorable reckoning -- >> so iraq sank what might have been a successful domestic policy agenda? >> right. well, what i mean is that i think the entire country stopped listening to president bush on what would be efficacious for the country when it lost fa
from george w. bush because it was the thing to do. numbers do not lie. he became very unpopular. parties do not have to embrace figures and politicians to become unpopular. my view is that a lot of distress over bush's domestic agenda from which they fled in 2005. it had been an ancillary result of failure to defend iraq and have a favorable recognition. >> what might have been a successful policy agenda? >> i think the entire country stopped listening to president bush which would be good for the country when it lost faith that he was managing the war effectively. he found it more difficult to get hearings on some of the issues. a lot of people on the right to it came at bush on a lot of these domestic issues. they were feeling extremely distressed about what was going on in the war and did not want to turn on the war. we have troops in the field. this seems like a noble endeavor. they were angry at him for throwing them on the defensive for the prosecution of the war. as a result of the republican party getting thrown on its heels of immigration, in 2006 i published a book on
and george w. bush began the second term as president and the minority rights you have in the u.s. senate, that requires more than 60 votes to usually get things done, was very instrumental in making sure that the second term of george w. bush wasn't a runaway freight train. now, what is true and i think progressives are coming from is that president obama's first two years in office, there was an unprecedented number of filibuster. it wasn't being used on big matters but on everything. but with the agreement was able to do last night was on some lower court judges as well as lower court cabinet positions, they're easier to pass as well as to be able to pass some procedural moves. very incremental change, thomas. the white house happy with it. progressives not so much. >> all right. so people that know the movie "mr. smith goes to washington" this is not like that. >> exactly. that was what liberals and progressives wanted the most. if you wanted to actually filibuster, you had to do it on the floor in person as long as it took. that was not part of the refor s s and that left some people
: many people are saying that this president could use george w. bush on the issue of immigration because he is that as a key domestic agenda item on for his second term and he felt pretty good president bush help him on immigration with republicans? pick it'm sure he could is a question of whether he wants to play that role. there are plenty of other surrogates who could play this role, and the most important one is marco rubio, who was not only of hispanic origin, but also younger and can appeal to this whole dreamers movement, and he is right here in washington serving in congress and drafting legislation and working on a bipartisan basis. there is also a large number of democrats and republicans who, while we don't hear about it, are working behind the scenes, like lindsey graham and charles schumer, on putting some kind of legislation out there. certainly bush, he decided to step forward, could play a constructive role. it is not like he is going to let democrats just because he decided to put himself out there on the issue. it would only help in terms of bringing republicans on boar
. ohio delivered the presidency for george w. bush. how we remember. this might be why reince priebus, reelected as the rnc chair, is so optimistic about the electoral future for the republicans. >> no state is that reliably a blue state. but it's up to all of us to decide if we're willing to fight for these states. it takes work. it's not going to happen overnight. but from what i've seen in wisconsin, we can make it happen. in two years, we all want to hear the words and the headlines republicans everywhere. >> well, this is the electoral map from the 2012 election. president obama won by four points in a large margin in the electoral college. this is what happens under the republicans' everywhere strategy. president obama still wins by four points, but loses the presidency in an electoral landslide. as long as this plan is out there, republicans will continue to downplay it. >> i would not be for it. i don't think there is any sort of national movement. and you have sort of convinced me that in virginia, there may not even be any state movement. it may be an isolated legislator. >>
citizens. >> repter: >> reporter: president george w. bush was outspoken in his support from the beginning. i think we have clear presidential support here, and what we have in our state, our conversation last night with the president, he cheered us on. >> it's important to keep in mind that for this plan to become law, it would have to pass the republican-controlled house of representatives. speaker boehner will allow it to come up with a vote. we want to talk about this. joining us from maryland, the democratic state senator of montgomery county and corey stewart, republican chairman of the prince william county bord of supervisors. chairman stewart, i want to start with you. you have been a longtime voice on the immigration debate, saying mainly that local and state governments have carried the bulk of issues. how do you see this today? is the federal government stepping up in your view? >> the federal government has no credibility with regard to immigration reform and enforcement. why would we believe that washington is going to enforce new immigration law if it's not enforcing the cur
party and of cuban descent. he will be influential. john mccain campaigned against george w. bush in 2000, a long time advocate of immigration reform is big advocate of this. democrats almost every case on this bipartisan committee as well as in the senate are expected to follow the president's lead whatever he outlines tomorrow many they're on board with that agenda. the big question and stumbling block has been for decades is border security. how do you define it, how do you support it? this includes the use of drones, technology, all kinds of electronic surveillance and et cetera, critics say there is not enough. you need a fence and more troops on the border. how that gets legislated and sorted out we her from the president and house republicans will be influence in the outcome. house republicans want to be very much a part of passing this legislation this time. jamie: i would love to see our troops continue to work down there. that would be so helpful. carl, thanks. jon: for more on the immigration reform plan let's bring if karl rove, former chief visor and deputy chief of s
, george w. bush dancing with laura bush for just seconds, less than a minute on the floor at each ball they attended. the clintons dancing to "make a wish" and there was that saxophone moment. at his second inaugural, what was unforgettable was the number of inaugural balls that year, 14 of them. and four years ago -- ♪ at last beyonce, ten balls and an image of the obamas riding in a golf cart, giving their feet a rest and the first lady wrapped in her husband's jacket to keep warm. david muir, abc news, washington. >> everybody loves those behind the scenes peeks. the obama administration decided to cut down to just two official balls this year, because the economic state of the country, they wanted to scale back. it's the fewest in decades. >> that makes sense for what's going on right now. >> reality of the times. did you get your invite? >> i got mine. >> no. mine. >> no. >> big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you m
fixing elections? more than a third of democrats think george w. bush's supporters probably rigged the election in ohio back in 2004 through voter fraud, including a majority of african-americans. about the same number of republicans, 36%, think obama's supporters did the same thing to win last november, although there was no evidence of any cheating or anything, even a machine foul up. think back to 9/11. more than a third of democrats are part of the truther crowd, people who believe president bush knew about the attacks before they happened, as do nearly 60% of african-americans. the difference in the parties is the knowledge base. republicans who know more about the news are actually more likely to believe conspiracy theories fueled by right wing media like fox. dan cassino is a political science professor at fairleigh dickinson university. and radio broadcaster michael smerconish. michael, you brought this to our attention. i want to get you as a generalist like me, what do you think this told you that surprised you, this poll? >> well, it reinforced what i have suspected all
tennet, in the george w. bush days. that is why john brennan didn't get the nomination to run the cia in the first time around. so his confirmation hearings this time around, february 7th, should be very interested. there is controversy there. the other nomination, where there used to be suspense, is former republican senator chuck hagel, i say there used to be suspense, because there were questions about whether there would be fight from the left have dried up. chris coombs, all have met with mr. hagel this week, he assuaged their worries, ditto, charles schumer, of new york, he addressed criticism of his hard-line anti-gay and anti-abortion political past. he addressed that criticism, where they largely neutralized it. ahead of his confirmation hearings on thursday, republicans are making noises about chuck hagel. the only strange remaining might be evidence of any interesting and therefore important resistance to chuck hagel is probably this ad, you might have seen from an unknown group called "use your mandate." >> chuck hagel, he has been nominated to be secretary of defense. and
who spent plenty of time in the minority, they have been in the minority when george w. bush had republican majorities in both houses. they saw the tax cuts go through, they have seen other instances where they're fearful enough that the worm will turn, and they want to be in a position where they can use their minority status for leverage. and if you put that together with the other reality, ezra, which is that all the other 100 senators who have egos like to use holds, sometimes even with their own president, to block action on a nomination. to give them a 2 x 4 across the forehead to gain something that may be entirely extranneous. >> thank you. >> the part of the election that people couldn't just start -- stop talking about. it was beyonce, and that is next. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing.
by george w. bush. at the beginning of a new congress a majority of the senators can change the rules. here's the letter in part. some have sought to elevate the debate to constitutional dimensions by suggesting that it is institutionally improper for a new senate to alter the senate's rules by skwroet srort because the internal procedures adopted by prior senates have required a two-third majority to allow a vote on a motion to alter the rules. with respect, such a concern confuses the power to change the senate rules during a session with the unquestioned constitutional power of each incoming senate to fix its own rules unencumbered by the decisions of past senates. the standing two-thirds requirement for altering the senate's rules is a sensible effort at preventing changes to the rules in the midst of the game. it cannot, however, prevent the senate at the beginning of a new game from adopting rules deemed necessary to permit the just, efficient and orderly operations of the 113th senate. we agree -- again, this is the letter from charles freed, solicitor general under president; michae
, but man there has been unprecedented disrespect for this president. when did -- george w. bush didn't go to the inauguration mitt romney didn't go to the inauguration. but they haven't impeached him for his private life or called his wife a lesbian. there is no doubt some of them are racist, but their contempt is reserved for the working class of america. because that's who they keep choosing to hurt time and time again. these guys choose to hurt you. >> stephanie: one question -- you don't mean lesbian like a bad thing, right? >> did i say lesbian? >> stephanie: yes. >> i believe the president doesn't like turtles. >> stephanie: okay. 46 minutes after the hour. back with more fridays with fugelsang on the "stephanie miller show." >> announcer: talk radio you can dance too. it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ on this planet for something more. i want this show to have an impact beyond just informing. an impact that gets people to take action themselves. as a human being, that's really important. this is not just a spectator sport. vanguard is all-new with a world
, republicans have not had a majority of votes. even though george w. bush served two terms, he did not get a majority in 2000 and barely got one in 2004? >> i'm not one to minimize the danger and challenge of the republican party. losing 25 senate seats this year -- president obama only got 51% of the vote. the economy is looking great. a lot of democratic incumbents looked people ribble. the senate cannot be gerrymandered. it looked like a clean a snapshot of the country. for republicans to win 8 waterboarded -- while democrats one -- republicans will 8 and democrats won 25, that is dangerous. we need to figure out what went wrong in 2012. i'm not for endless naval gazing. there are plenty of fights to be had. where can we cooperate with president obama? in some ways, you lose an election, and you think about it for a few months. and you get back right on the horse and try to start writing again and figure out what we believe and and what fights we want to have and what policies we want to -- want to propose. host: politico wrote about you -- what have you been doing? guest: it is interes
assistant to president george w. bush and martin frost is a former texas congressman. thank you both for joining us. >> thank you, thank you. good to be here. >> the current senate makeup. let's take a look at the numbers. 55 democrats, 45 republicans currently. in 2014, 33 seats will be up for re-election. don't go the way of general elections. congressman frost what do you think is going to happen? >> well, first of all, this is a subject i know a fair amount about. i was chairman of the democratic congressional campaign committee in 1998, the last time you had the so-called six year itch when the president's party is supposed to lose seats in the sixth year of the president's term. we actually picked up five seats in the house and we broke even in the senate. but what is happening here is that the republican party actually had this same opportunity in 2010 and 2012 and they nominated candidates that were too far to the right and lost some races they shouldn't have lost that happened in missouri and in indiana and in this last election it happened in delaware and colorado and nevad
at george w. bush's second inn inaugur inaugural. he will be speaking this morning. his theme, unity and bridging divisions in the country. so, the president and his family, enter st. john's episcopal church. we will have them when they come out of the service, in about an hour. >>> for right now, let's go up to sam in new york with the weather. >> texas over there. okay. oh, hi. how are you guys? i couldn't hear a thing. we're outside in times square. we got great things going on here, as well. we might not be as crowded as the washington mall. but let me tell you, we're just as happy folks. let's get to the boards. one or two things going on this morning we want to show you. we'll start with the pictures. why torture us, ft. lauderdale? why do that? you're sending us pictures just to rub it in. there's baltimore this morning. elsewhere, here's what happens with the low. now that we have the cold air and it starts to drop, if you think it's cold in times square right now, wait until tomorrow morning. how many will be here tomorrow, as well? you will? where are you from? >> i'm from
president george w. bush did, referred to as number 43 in texas, dallas, texas. number 43 had 60 straight months of economic growth. 60 straight months of economic growth with the underpinning of reducing taxes so that americans would go and work harder and see the incentive for creating jobs and would want to buy into the philosophy that the harder that we work, our country benefits. . ed underpinnings of social security, of medicare, of medicaid systems that are very important to our country. reducing the number of people who have to receive government assistance is what happens when you have job growth. protecting the long-term interest of this country and growing the american dream. the gentlewoman from houston is absolutely correct, and the methodology towards getting there is not higher taxes, it is not higher spending, it is giving more freedom and opportunity. it is having a reduced size of the government, not a bigger government. it is giving people an opportunity to have fewer rules and regulations, not more rules and regulations. so the process that the republican party believe
, when president george w. bush was in office. that didn't last long. go back to president ronald reag reagan, republicans talking about the reagan revolution. from eight years of reagan, four years of bush, eight years of clinton, eight years of bush, that reagan's vision, if you will, sort of dominated the conversation. here's what speaker boehner has to understand. look on the state level, republican governors and state legislatures. you have republicans who control more state branches than they actually do democrats, and so this is just typical political whining as will said, both sides want to be in control. it's no doubt because you want to govern a lot easier, if your party controls all levels of political office. >> carol can we talk about what inspired boehner's statement? and that is that president obama's speech was openly progressive, not just on its face on its policy goals like you pointed out in climate change or gun control but in its philosophy as well. >> and? >> the elevation of collectiveism, of collective right, collective action. this is the cycle of american poli
bill clinton and marc thiessen, a former speech writer for george w. bush. and senator johnson didn't get a chance to answer the question that secretary clinton asked of him. what difference it make, why the people at the consulate that night, why they were there? >> you must be relieved to learn megyn, that you and katherine herridge and everybody at fox news are wasting your time, it doesn't make a difference how the americans died or whether the american people were misled how they died. this is a scandal not just because four americans were killed, it's not just a scandal because the administration ignored numerous warnings about the growing threat from al-qaeda. it's not just a scandal because they ignored and denied ambassador chris stevens' request for more security or didn't have forces in place to rescue them. it's a scandal for repeate an extended period laid the blame on a youtube video when any person watching events unfold know that wasn't the case. congress has a right to ask these questions and a responsible to ask these questions and secretary clinton has a responsib
that george w. bush won his first term in? >> this is the party that believes they are cutting taxes on the wealthiest of americans and it will create jobs. >> right. so bobby jindal, you know, the rnc came out with its blueprint of what went wrong. i don't think they are going to answer those questions. but the problem is they are going to hurt now or later. it's better to hurt now but they have to change and can't just tinker. >> they have to change so much i don't think they will be able to do it. a friend of bill. i will be back with the day's parting shot, wrapping up the week here on "full-court press." >> this is the bill press show. [ male announcer ] pillsbury grands biscuits. delicious. but say i press a few out flat... add some beef sloppy joe sauce... and cheese fold it all up and boom! i just made an unbeatable unsloppy joe pillsbury grands biscuits. let the making begin. [ female announcer ] what would you call an ordinary breakfast pastry that's been wrapped in a flaky crust stuffed with a gooey center toa
of the electorate. obviously john mccain has talked about this since seven. george w. bush was very involved in this. jeb bush is speaking very strongly in favor of this type of citizenship. the trouble they are likely to run into is in the house of representatives, right. >> reporter: one would think so. the problem with this bill for the critics in the house is that it is, call it what you will, whatever name you use it's an amnesty bill in the sense that people who came here illegally and who are here now will be able to attain a provisional legal status. that won't make them citizens, that will be a much more come ph*ebg complex, they get to come out of the shadows and be here legally and work here legal leave. a lot of people will say that is amnesty. amnesty is a word that fires up people who were really reoccupied and concerned about this issue. this is one of these issues where intensity matters. you look at that big number, 66% in favor of a path for citizenship for these people. how many people are really passionate about it? it's hard to know. a great many of those who will oppose it are
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)